Author Richard Jorgensen reveals ‘The Manifesto’

SEBRING, Fla. – Author Richard Jorgensen’s distaste with how the current federal government mishandles the country’s affairs in foreign policy, the economy and instilling disruptive social engineering through faulty legislation and executive orders designed to promote a socialistic agenda inspired him to write “The Manifesto“.the-manifesto

In this book, readers are offered a fictional look at how foreign advisories might have developed a plan to disrupt, corrupt and destroy the economy and culture of the United States. It reveals how diligent individuals work to uncover and prevent the implementation of such a plan and avoid the successful decay of society. Readers will get to test if truth is stranger than fiction. They will also discover how the naivety of the American public can blindly led to elect officials with less than the best interest of the country and its peoples at heart.

Caught up in the Korean Police Action of the 1950s, a Marine Reservist is captured by North Korean forces and subjected to mind washing, as labeled by his communist captors. Repatriated after months of severe psychological and physical torture, the marine finds himself in a recuperation ward at the Army Hospital in San Francisco. His fiancée makes every effort to aid in the marine’s recovery by joining him in Washington, DC, where a sudden windfall and position at the Bureau of Standards leads to his involvement in international intrigue and espionage. A manual, eventually defined as a manifesto, is discovered outlining the methods by foreign agents to destroy the economy and culture of the United States.

An excerpt from the book:

“My goodness, it’s 2008 and I just remembered something our friend Trip once told me. He said the day a Negro with Islamic sympathies is elected President, we will have failed and all is lost. I never knew what he meant. Those men were so secretive back then.”

Living in Sebring, Florida, retirement is more than golf clubs and fishing rods for Richard Jorgensen. Writing, a longtime passion, has found a special place in his life. Author of two previously published fictional novels, telling a tale in print is as easy as reciting a bedtime story to his 5-year-old granddaughter, Avery. Graduating from the University of Georgia in Athens, with a degree in psychology, gives him the ability to tell his stories with surprising ease and humanistic appeal.

 

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