Iowa and Ohio in play as Johnson reaches 12% in key states

August 10, 2016 — A new poll out this morning for the key presidential states of Iowa and Ohio show Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in trouble as Gary Johnson gains in popularity. The NBC/Marist/WSJ poll found Libertarian Party presidential nominee Gary Johnson earning 12 percent of vote total in both Iowa and Ohio. Republican Party presidential nominee Donald Trump earned 35 percent in Ohio and 35 percent in Iowa, while Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton earned 39 percent in Ohio and 35 percent Iowa. Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein earned 4 percent in Ohio and 6 percent in Iowa in the poll. Only Clinton, Johnson and Trump are expected to be on the ballot in all 50 states while Stein is expected to be on the ballot in 24 states.

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Libertarian Party presidential nominee Gov. Gary Johnson

Only Clinton, Johnson and Trump are expected to be on the ballot in all 50 states while Stein is expected to be on the ballot in 24 states. Johnson continues to be a serious factor in the 2016 presidential election even though he has been largely ignored by the establishment media. For example, MSNBC’s popular Morning Joe show has spent more airtime on Evan McMullin running for president than Gary Johnson, yet McMullin, at most, will be on 10 state ballots as an independent candidate. Johnson is occasionally on some of the news shows; however, is not treated equally alongside Trump or Clinton even though his story is more interesting and his candidacy will have a major impact in the November general election.

At this point, it is not looking likely that any of the three major presidential candidates, Clinton, Johnson or Trump, will garner at least 50 percent of the electoral votes which could throw the election into the hands of the Republican-controlled U.S. House. If no candidate receives a majority of Electoral votes, the House of Representatives elects the President from the three Presidential candidates who received the most Electoral votes. Each state delegation has one vote. The Senate would elect the Vice President from the two Vice Presidential candidates with the most Electoral votes. Each Senator would cast one vote for Vice President. If the House of Representatives fails to elect a President by Inauguration Day, the Vice-President Elect serves as acting President until the deadlock is resolved in the House.

 

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